Home | National Symbols | The National Motto, Pledge and Watchwords

The National Motto, Pledge and Watchwords

Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font

NATIONAL MOTTO Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve

NATIONAL MOTTO
Together We Aspire, Together We Achieve

 

THE NATIONAL PLEDGE

By: Marjorie Padmore

 

I solemnly pledge

To dedicate my life

To the service of my God

And my country.

I will honour

My parents, my teachers,

My leaders and my elders

And those in authority.

I will be

Clean and honest

In all my thoughts,

My words and my deeds.

I will strive

In everything I do

To work together with my fellowmen

Of every creed and race

For the greater happiness of all

And honour and glory

Of my country

 

Ms Marjorie Padmore, a former teacher, musician, choir Mistress/Organist penned Trinidad and Tobago’s National Pledge.

 

 

 

NATIONAL WATCHWORDSwatchwords_745358119.jpg

 

Discipline, Production, Tolerance

 

“I have given to the nation as its watch words DISCIPLINE, PRODUCTION, TOLERANCE, they apply as much as to you the young people as to your parents. The discipline is both individual and national. The individual cannot be allowed to seek his personal interests and gratify his personal ambitions at the expense of a nation. We must produce in order to enjoy. Wealth does not drop from the sky for any individual or any nation. Reduce production, skylark on the job, take twice as long to do a job and make it cost twice as much, do any of these things and in effect you reduce the total amount available to be shared among the total number of people. You don’t pull your weight and you fatten at the expense of others... some of you have ancestors who came from one country, some from another, others from a third. Some of you profess one religion, some another, others a third or fourth. You in your schools have, like the nation in general, only two alternatives. You learn to live together in peace or you fight it out and destroy one another. The second alternative makes no sense and is sheer barbarism. The first alternative is civilised and is simple common sense. You the children, yours is the great responsibility to educate your parents, teach them to live together in harmony. The difference is not race, or colour of skin, but merit only difference of wealth and family status being rejected in favour of equality of opportunities. I call upon all of you young people to practice what you sing today and tomorrow; to translate the ideal of our national anthem into a code of everyday behaviour, and to make our nation one in which every creed and race find an equal place”

 

Dr Eric Williams, First Prime Minister T & T on the occasion of Independence Youth Rally at the Queen’s Park Oval on August 30th, 1962.



 

  • email Email to a friend
  • print Print version
  • Plain text Plain text

Rate this article
3.81